Fly silly seabird, no dreams can possess you

Do we all fall into contemplative moods in the weeks leading up to our birthdays, or is it just me?

One thing I’m pondering is the fact that the neighborhood seagulls wake me up lately at 4:30 or so. They caterwaul overhead, starting before dawn, screaming bloody murder at one another in the sky. City seagulls! They sound like Southie mothers shrieking, “SEAN, you betta not end up like ya fuckin FATHA!!” and “Bobby O’Houlihan, if I catch ya I’m gonna SKIN YA ALIVE!”

When I look out the window, I can see one of them on the rooftop across the street, strutting along the peak, shrieking its head off, probably at another gull on another rooftop, waiting for a response, then shrieking back.

The British aren’t coming. They have no predators to warn one another about, that I know of. The sun isn’t even up yet; what urgent news could there be to impart? How is this productive? How does this advance their cause in the world? Why aren’t they down by the water, catching fish and nourishing themselves?

Seagulls are mysterious, I conclude every morning. Then I put in earplugs, pull a pillow over my head, and go back to sleep.

Inside the house, during this fresh, sweet, blue-green-gold Maine summer, I’m passing my days with four solid goals in mind: train for the 10K race in September, finish the Moose book, judge the Kirkus literary contest, and get my driver’s license. Every day, I try to make progress on three out of four fronts. And it’s working. I’m learning to parallel park, and today I’m going to take us on the Interstate. I’ve knocked almost all the books off my third of the list and am about to move on to the other two judges’ picks and the late entries. I’m starting to write the chapter about lobsters in the Moose book, and, in a stroke of perfect timing, today we’re going up north to Phippsburg to go out on the boat with our lobsterman pal, Ethan.

The first time I ran, at the beginning of June, I kept losing my wind and had to slow to a walk till I caught it again. Every time I go out, I can run a little farther, a little faster. I ran four miles on Friday evening, from our back door to the end of the Eastern Prom and then back to Bam Bam bakery on Commercial Street, then I walked the rest of our daily route home; eventually, maybe by the end of August, I’ll be able to run all 5 ½ miles at one go, even the uphill part at the end.

In my experience, that’s how things get done: by increments and daily practice. I don’t know any shortcuts.

It’s not the most exciting summer anyone’s ever had, to put it mildly, but internally, it is life-changing, even radical. To focus so completely on four worthy goals at once, to have the time and liberty and discipline to pursue them all to the fullest, and to feel myself able and capable of doing so, is a profound experience of fun, adventure, and satisfaction.

As an unexpected consequence, other, necessary, important aspects of my life are shifting, changing, and improving—some in explosive bursts of revelation and almost involuntary action, others in a deep, underground way I’m hardly aware of until they manifest themselves, and some a combination of the two.

I’m turning 52 on August 22, and in all the years since I was old enough to drive, although I’ve had four learner’s permits and even learned to drive 25 years ago, I have never once taken a driving test; something always prevented me, probably my own fears. This time, I’m going to do it.

And this time around, I’m writing a book I want, rather than need, to write, a crucial distinction. I am very glad I wrote “Blue Plate Special,” but as I worked on it, I sensed, beyond the chronology of my own life, another interesting (to me) idea for a book about my happy life in New England and the current economic reality of food in this country and the intersection of those two things. I had to write that other book to get to this one, and I did, and now here I am. Writing this book makes me happy, excited; writing that one was painful and anxiety-inducing. But every book has its own trajectory, and nothing can be rushed.

In 2002, I ran the New York City marathon. I completed it in 3 hours and 58 minutes. I find it hard to believe now, but never having run before, I had set a goal for myself of under four hours, and I achieved it, in spite of a hospitalization for hyponatremia, IT band problems that required physical therapy, and severe pronation that was resolved finally with handmade, expensive orthotics.

And then, after all that trouble and expense and commitment, I stopped running immediately after the marathon—until now, 12 years later.

Training for the 10K race feels small by comparison, but it’s not, it’s something else entirely. The marathon was a one-off thing, intended to help me recover from a profound depression following 9/11. This upcoming race is not the point. Running is the point. And I hadn’t intended certain side effects of running, but I’m drinking much less alcohol lately (one ice-cold low-alcohol sorghum beer is nothing short of divine after a run and a shower, but that’s it, I’m done), eating differently and less (almost no red meat; two smallish meals a day), sleeping more deeply (seagulls aside). After the race, I plan to keep running and see what other good things might happen, even if it’s only increased wind and stamina. At almost-52, those might be the best things I could ask for.

And despite the masses of piles and rows of books around my clawfoot tub and on the downstairs bookshelves, I’m happy to spend a few months reading so many good novels and story collections. Running, writing, reading, driving. And Pilates, and smaller writing deadlines, and sneaking purely-for-pleasure reading, and walking Dingo. That’s my summer.

Meanwhile, I’m not cooking much, not thinking about food except as it relates to the Moose book. It takes a lot for food to recede from the forefront of my mind. I wonder how and when I’ll come back to my lifelong love affair with it.

When I do, I plan to make Moroccan chicken for Brendan with one of the intriguing spice packets I just got in the mail from Laura, a reader in Oregon, who made it for her now-fiancé, George, on their first date. She told me in her letter that when people ask when they’re getting married, she answers, “One of these days.” That’s what Brendan and I always say. That’s another goal, the best one.

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About Kate Christensen

eater, citizen, enthusiast, curmudgeon
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10 Responses to Fly silly seabird, no dreams can possess you

  1. bobblesse says:

    A very inspiring post for me. Small increments and daily practice, that will help me with my list. Thanks.

  2. celiathepoet says:

    I think I secretly thought it was, “Fly, city seagull…”

  3. Love this and can relate. I’ll be 52 in Sept., ran my first marathon in 2002 as a 40th birthday gift to myself (I did go on to run 13 more in the next 10 years) and am trying to get back into ‘training mode’ for an upcoming 20K in New Haven. Our other goals are different, still trying to accomplish mine one day at a time. Thanks!

  4. Annie says:

    So nice to hear about the new book since I LOVED Blue Plate and recommended it to friends!

  5. bette hanauer says:

    I love your summer goals! You sound healthy, happy, and productive! I’m very excited to hear there’s a new book on the way. Good luck!

  6. laurahanj says:

    My 50th is coming up on August 18. We must both be Leos.

  7. David Sumner says:

    Interesting you mentioning the gulls, reading your note, you seem to soar. Lovely. Best on all fronts (as if I had any doubts).

  8. Lovely post, as always. How I would love to run; my feet won’t cooperate, my heart is broken (literally). So I’ll run vicariously.

  9. Ken from County Cork says:

    Wait till you’re 60.
    EVERY decision in life is then based on a haphazard guess of how long you have to live.
    You try to work it out on a formula of how many drugs you’ve consumed over the previous decades,how heavy you drink and how much pressure you think, in a non-scienitific way, your heart has been subjected to.
    But what you can never remember is the exact day when you changed from being a free-wheeling,up-all-night,who-gives-a-fuck party animal into wondering whether oatmeal should form a part of your daily diet.
    Bollocks if I can remember but I suspect it was a Tuesday.
    Wahaay !

  10. Rev. Jeneba says:

    I am so happy to have found your Blog! I am half way through “Blue Plate Special” and was already beginning to mourn the loss of the Voice that has been nurturing me and sustaining me through the past few days…. It is especially precious to me since I grew up in Rockland County pretty much at the same time you were living there and I always yearned to attend a school like Green Meadow… I am so glad to find out years later what, exactly, I was missing…. I cannot thank you enough for your Gifts! ~Jeneba

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